Tiny Sandy Cay reveals the big lie

Antonio T. Carpio - @inquirerdotnet 05/13/2021

There is a tiny sandbar called Sandy Cay about two nautical miles from Pag-asa Island, which at about 37 hectares is the largest Philippine-occupied island in the Spratlys. Before 2017, Sandy Cay was a disappearing sandbar. Half…

Massacre in Cebu

Ambeth R. Ocampo - @inquirerdotnet 05/12/2021

While history is mainly built on narratives from verified facts, we should also be sensitive to its silences. For example, our focus on the Victory at Mactan on April 27 obscures the Massacre in Cebu on May…

Chronicling Mama’s story

Jhesset Thrina O. Enano - @inquirerdotnet 05/11/2021

Saved in my phone gallery is a video clip that runs for a minute and eight seconds. These are 68 seconds seared in my brain, playing in an endless loop inside my head during sleepless nights. In…

Kuwentong Kule: The sinking of Bohol during the fiesta month of May

ATTY. DENNIS GORECHO 05/11/2021

If not for the pandemic, Bohol should have been sinking this month. It is jokingly said Bohol is “sinking” during May because the population of the island during this month is multiplied twice, thrice, or even four…

What explains Duterte’s behavior toward China?

Joel Ruiz Butuyan - @inquirerdotnet 05/10/2021

It’s hard to imagine how any Filipino can be supportive of President Duterte’s submissive, fawning behavior toward China notwithstanding the latter’s belligerent claim over a huge area of our marine-rich waters. No matter how disillusioned we may…

Three mothers

Randy David - @inquirerdotnet 05/09/2021

What would Mama say? It’s a question I would frequently hear from our four children. They don’t mean: How their mother would react to something, but how she would interpret a situation or problem with her remarkable…

Wealth tax the way to go in this crisis

Solita Collas-Monsod - @inquirerdotnet 05/08/2021

Anent last week’s column, which suggested that the Philippines impose a wealth tax on its wealthiest Filipino families, proceeds of which would be used to finance the war against COVID-19 and its victims, it turns out that…

Of pandemic-era mothers

Hyacinth Tagupa - @inquirerdotnet 05/07/2021

None of us was truly prepared when the pandemic broke out. We didn’t know what to do with our fear, or how to keep up with constantly developing science. We weren’t ready to keep kids out of…

President Duterte’s policies in the WPS

Antonio T. Carpio - @inquirerdotnet 05/06/2021

Presidential spokesperson Harry Roque praised President Duterte’s policies in the West Philippine Sea (WPS) as “careful, calibrated, and calculated.” In contrast, Roque assailed proposals from former foreign secretary Albert del Rosario and myself as “illegal, impractical, and…

Damages due to unauthorized substitution of employment contract

ATTY. DENNIS R. GORECHO 05/05/2021

Licensed recruitment agencies will be liable for damages due to the unauthorized substitution of the government-approved employment contracts. The Supreme Court stressed this principle in the case of recent case of Marcelo M. Corpuz vs. Gerwil Crewing…

One-China policy

Manuel L. Quezon III - @inquirerdotnet 05/05/2021

Near the end of the last administration, I came to believe, and still believe, that one of its mantras — “Kayo ang Boss ko” — was actually secretly hated by the public, since it is the same…

Populist tragedy: India, Brazil, PH

Richard Heydarian - @inquirerdotnet 05/04/2021

Over the past years, from Brazil to India and the Philippines, millions of voters have placed their faith in charismatic strongmen who thrive on apocalyptic rhetoric and who promised to single-handedly address complex 21st-century challenges. Recently, however,…

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