Brace for hotter days in May

By Michelle Joy L. Padayhag |April 30,2017 - 11:06 PM
EL NINO/MARCH 16,2016:The scorching heat of the sun did not bother Raul Caneda from carrying a sack of sand from his 12-foot deep quarry. With sources like Mananga River drying up due to El Nino spell, quarries like Raul see it as an advantage to dig deeper as they can. (CDN PHOTO/FERDINAND EDRALIN)

EL NINO/MARCH 16,2016:The scorching heat of the sun did not bother Raul Caneda from carrying a sack of sand from his 12-foot deep quarry. With sources like Mananga River drying up due to El Nino spell, quarries like Raul see it as an advantage to dig deeper as they can. (CDN PHOTO/FERDINAND EDRALIN)

IF you think the weather’s been really warm the past few weeks, brace yourself for even hotter days ahead.

Alfredo Quiblat, chief of Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) Mactan, said May is the hottest month based on their climatological data.

“The hottest recorded in Cebu was on May 31, 2010 with 37 degrees Celsius. That was also triggered because of the presence of El Niño,” Quiblat told Cebu Daily News.

Last year, the Philippines also experienced El Niño and the hottest temperature recorded in May 2016 was 35 degrees Celsius.

Quiblat said although there is no El Niño experienced this year, their forecast temperature for May is as high as 35 degrees Celsius.

Heat index, which is the combination of air temperature and humidity or the actual temperature felt by the body, will even be higher at more than 40 degrees Celsius.

The heat island effect or the presence of buildings and structures contributes to the high temperature being felt.

So far, the highest temperature this year recorded by the weather bureau was on April 29, Saturday which was 33.1 degrees Celsius, with a heat index of 39 degrees Celsius.

Quiblat advised the public to stay indoors as much as possible from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is at its peak, and drink more water to avoid heat strokes.

The website of the Department of Health (DOH) lists symptoms of heat stroke like sweating, intense thirst, dizziness, fainting, weakness, and high blood pressure.

Most vulnerable are the elderly and those with other health problems.

The public is also advised to wear sunglasses to protect the eyes from glare and bacteria and viruses which could cause sore eyes or conjunctivitis.

Sore eyes is manifested by redness and inflammation of the membranes covering the white part of the eyes and the membranes in the inner part of the eyelids.

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